Fully Fit Therapy

"Getting you Fully Fit From Home"

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Shred Snow, Not Your Body!

Are you planning or have already booked a trip to the slopes? If so, are you prepared? I am not referring to your purchase of the latest ‘look’ to cruise the slopes in style or working out the best Apres ski spots. I am referring to yourself!

Your body, is it prepared and ready to take on the physical demands of skiing or snowboarding to return home without a cast and or crutches? Alpine skiing and snowboarding are classified as very extreme sports due to the involvement of high speeds and an increased propensity for participants to jump and perform acrobatic maneuvers (as seen on TV think The Jump on channel 4).

There are risks involved when participating in snow sports. Alpine skiing and snowboarding take place in environments where medical care may not be readily available on site. Because of these challenges, greater emphasis needs to be placed on skill, preparation, and safety strategies/equipment to prevent serious injury.

I would hope the only time you ride in the chopper is for a scenic flip or heli-ski and not a rescue off the mountain to the local hospital! Before travelling triple check your medical insurance includes extreme sports, as if not you better get an upgrade to it!

In both skiing and snowboarding, the leading cause of death and catastrophic injury is traumatic brain injury (TBI). Head injuries and concussions account for 25 to 30% of injuries, with one of the most high profile cases in recent years being none other than Michael Schumacher springing to mind.  Musculoskeletal injuries are far more common, albeit less serious.

When skiing you are at greater risk of sustaining an injury to your lower limb; most commonly knee injuries like tearing the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) or sprains and tears to the collateral ligaments of the knee. Snowboarders on the other hand sustain most injuries to their upper limb; frequently sprains or fractures to the hand and wrist or shoulder dislocations.  

Thankfully however it’s not all doom and gloom. Wearing a helmet and being physically prepared for your trip can significantly reduce your risk of injury. There are also many benefits to a skiing holiday, not only is it fun and being outdoors enjoying the beauty of your natural surroundings is good for your soul and mental outlook. But undoubtedly the physical exertion is great exercise for your musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. These tips can help make your winter wonderland wicked rather than weary and wounded!

Why not start your holiday in tip top condition? If you know you have a knee or back niggle visit my self for some hands-on treatments and exercise prescription so you can enjoy your trip without any flare-ups. I can also prescribe strengthening exercises for your knees and quadriceps muscles (thigh muscles); the stronger they are the better they can absorb the impacts of skiing and snowboarding without injury.

Yoga, Pilates and core strengthening will protect your back and improve your balance which again may save you from a tumble and subsequent injury. In addition to this being physically fit will make your skiing better and more enjoyable. Injuries often occur later in the day when fatigue sets in and concentration levels starts to drop. The fitter you are the longer you will be able to stay out on the slopes without increasing your injury risk. Ask your physical therapist for advice on aerobic training leading up to your holiday.

Fortunately, most snow sport injuries can be treated with rest, bracing, pain medication and Sports Therapist. Some more severe fractures and ligament tears may require surgical intervention where recovery periods can vary from 3 to 6 months, and necessitate intensive rehabilitation. So, remember, on returning from your trip, should you have any sprains or strains get treatment early, rather than waiting to see if it will resolve itself. Early treatment and rehabilitation of an injury guarantees better long term outcomes. Chronic pain is a serious condition that can become complex and frustratingly stubborn to manage and overcome.

I’ve put together a guide called “6 Strategies for Avoiding Injury on the Slopes” and it’s accompanied by two leaflets with videos, containing six power exercises for either snowboarding or skiing. To download the leaflet click here

A skiing holiday is great fun, and these risks shouldn’t deter you from going and enjoying your time. Use these tips to get better prepared and stay injury free.

Lastly I hope you enjoy your snow holiday, if you would like more information on exercises to help before you go or to book a session. Just give me a call on 07759689612 or drop me an email at [email protected]. I look forward to hearing from you

Are you planning or have already booked a trip to the slopes? If so, are you prepared? I am not referring to your purchase of the latest ‘look’ to cruise the slopes in style or working out the best Apres ski spots. I am referring to yourself!

Your body, is it prepared and ready to take on the physical demands of skiing or snowboarding to return home without a cast and or crutches? Alpine skiing and snowboarding are classified as very extreme sports due to the involvement of high speeds and an increased propensity for participants to jump and perform acrobatic maneuvers (as seen on TV think The Jump on channel 4).

There are risks involved when participating in snow sports. Alpine skiing and snowboarding take place in environments where medical care may not be readily available on site. Because of these challenges, greater emphasis needs to be placed on skill, preparation, and safety strategies/equipment to prevent serious injury.

I would hope the only time you ride in the chopper is for a scenic flip or heli-ski and not a rescue off the mountain to the local hospital! Before travelling triple check your medical insurance includes extreme sports, as if not you better get an upgrade to it!

In both skiing and snowboarding, the leading cause of death and catastrophic injury is traumatic brain injury (TBI). Head injuries and concussions account for 25 to 30% of injuries, with one of the most high profile cases in recent years being none other than Michael Schumacher springing to mind.  Musculoskeletal injuries are far more common, albeit less serious.

When skiing you are at greater risk of sustaining an injury to your lower limb; most commonly knee injuries like tearing the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) or sprains and tears to the collateral ligaments of the knee. Snowboarders on the other hand sustain most injuries to their upper limb; frequently sprains or fractures to the hand and wrist or shoulder dislocations.  

Thankfully however it’s not all doom and gloom. Wearing a helmet and being physically prepared for your trip can significantly reduce your risk of injury. There are also many benefits to a skiing holiday, not only is it fun and being outdoors enjoying the beauty of your natural surroundings is good for your soul and mental outlook. But undoubtedly the physical exertion is great exercise for your musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. These tips can help make your winter wonderland wicked rather than weary and wounded!

Why not start your holiday in tip top condition? If you know you have a knee or back niggle visit my self for some hands-on treatments and exercise prescription so you can enjoy your trip without any flare-ups. I can also prescribe strengthening exercises for your knees and quadriceps muscles (thigh muscles); the stronger they are the better they can absorb the impacts of skiing and snowboarding without injury.

Yoga, Pilates and core strengthening will protect your back and improve your balance which again may save you from a tumble and subsequent injury. In addition to this being physically fit will make your skiing better and more enjoyable. Injuries often occur later in the day when fatigue sets in and concentration levels starts to drop. The fitter you are the longer you will be able to stay out on the slopes without increasing your injury risk. Ask your physical therapist for advice on aerobic training leading up to your holiday.

Fortunately, most snow sport injuries can be treated with rest, bracing, pain medication and Sports Therapist. Some more severe fractures and ligament tears may require surgical intervention where recovery periods can vary from 3 to 6 months, and necessitate intensive rehabilitation. So, remember, on returning from your trip, should you have any sprains or strains get treatment early, rather than waiting to see if it will resolve itself. Early treatment and rehabilitation of an injury guarantees better long term outcomes. Chronic pain is a serious condition that can become complex and frustratingly stubborn to manage and overcome.

I’ve put together a guide called “6 Strategies for Avoiding Injury on the Slopes” and it’s accompanied by two leaflets with videos, containing six power exercises for either snowboarding or skiing. To download the leaflet click here

A skiing holiday is great fun, and these risks shouldn’t deter you from going and enjoying your time. Use these tips to get better prepared and stay injury free.

Lastly I hope you enjoy your snow holiday, if you would like more information on exercises to help before you go or to book a session. Just give me a call on 07759689612 or drop me an email at [email protected]. I look forward to hearing from you

My 5th Principle Of Lower Back Pain

My 4th Principle Of Lower Back Pain

My 3rd Principle Of Lower Back Pain

My 2nd Principle Of Lower Back Pain

My 1st Principle Of Lower Back Pain

My 5 Principles Of Fixing Lower Back Pain

The 1# Cheat To Improve Your Squat

​Wouldn't you love to buy a bit of kit that would help you improve your squat ten fold?

Sounds too good to be true doesn't it?

Well.... this cheat is lifting shoes!

​How Do They Work?


Lifting shoes angle your foot so it is resting in a slight bit of plantarflexion (i.e movement of pushing your accelerator to the floor)

It does this by having a slight heel of around 2 to 2.5cm.

This slight heel increases plantarflexion by 3.5 degrees to 5 degrees, this then makes it feel like your dorsiflexion has increased. However it is more of an illusion as instead of your foot starting of flat it starts of slightly plantarflexed


​Conclusion


So if you are too lazy too follow my previous blog posts on fixing your squat this is a perfect cheat to help you squat a lot better by just changing your shoes!

If you aren't happy 'cheating' and want to improve your squat without relying on some magic shoes book in with me today to help you get on track and fully fit... see below for one of the many clients I have helped 

​​

Injury Treatment review


​L. Brymner

​Recreational Gym User

​​I had suffered a bad strain from the gym in my upper back trap area and was very immobile and causing me tension headaches. Rob managed to source the problem and relieve some of the soreness and get me on the road to recovery my back and neck were back too 100% within a couple of days and I was back in the gym, could not recommend rob more if you've got any pains or long lasting injuries I'd highly suggest you see Rob! Lewis



​For more information on squatting shoes give the below a read!

Sato, K., Fortenbaugh, D., & Hydock, D. S. (2012). Kinematic changes using weightlifting shoes on barbell back squat. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 26(1), 28-33.

​Wouldn't you love to buy a bit of kit that would help you improve your squat ten fold?

Sounds too good to be true doesn't it?

Well.... this cheat is lifting shoes!

​How Do They Work?

Lifting shoes angle your foot so it is resting in a slight bit of plantarflexion (i.e movement of pushing your accelerator to the floor)

It does this by having a slight heel of around 2 to 2.5cm.

This slight heel increases plantarflexion by 3.5 degrees to 5 degrees, this then makes it feel like your dorsiflexion has increased. However it is more of an illusion as instead of your foot starting of flat it starts of slightly plantarflexed

​Conclusion

So if you are too lazy too follow my previous blog posts on fixing your squat this is a perfect cheat to help you squat a lot better by just changing your shoes!

If you aren't happy 'cheating' and want to improve your squat without relying on some magic shoes book in with me today to help you get on track and fully fit... see below for one of the many clients I have helped 

​​

Injury Treatment review

​L. Brymner

​Recreational Gym User

​​I had suffered a bad strain from the gym in my upper back trap area and was very immobile and causing me tension headaches. Rob managed to source the problem and relieve some of the soreness and get me on the road to recovery my back and neck were back too 100% within a couple of days and I was back in the gym, could not recommend rob more if you've got any pains or long lasting injuries I'd highly suggest you see Rob! Lewis

​For more information on squatting shoes give the below a read!

Sato, K., Fortenbaugh, D., & Hydock, D. S. (2012). Kinematic changes using weightlifting shoes on barbell back squat. The Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, 26(1), 28-33.

Number 1 Alternative to the Squat!

The Most Important Part of the Squat

​Following on from last weeks post and 6 top tips for your squat  i'm going to be talking about the most important part of the squat... this being DORSI-FLEXION

Insert Image

​What's DorsiFlexion?

​Dorsiflexion is the movement of bringing the front of your foot towards your shin.

It's such a simple movement and is crucial for an array of things from walking and running, through to todays topic of squatting.

How Does This Apply To My Squat?

The most crucial movement in a squat is maintaining a neutral or slightly extended spine as you lower down.

Once your lower back rounds into flexion (think of a nice curvy C), your form breaks, and there is a very dangerous load on your lower back and muscles.

 This obviously is the opposite of what you want, you are actually looking for your glutes to be loaded and firing. This doesn’t happen when you have your nice curvy C rounded back.

In an ideal squat, you are shifting your weight back just like you’re sitting back into a chair. This chair however is invisible!

So you’ve checked your form, and you sit back into your ‘invisible chair’ the posterior, and you lower down close to 90 degrees…and, you feel like you can’t get any lower! You try to maintain the form above and stop the curvy C but you just can’t keep your back straight and go lower!

You feel perfectly strong enough, but you just can’t get any lower and feel stuck.

This is you having limited or poor​ or however you want to describe it dorsiflexion

​How to check for a lack or dorsiflexion

1. Squat normally, check the angle between your hips, knees, and ankles.

2. Slide some 1″ blocks, weight plates or even books under your heels. Squat again and re-check the angle.

I’m guessing it got easier?! And you could sit further back!

 If the answer to the above was “yes”, you have reduced dorsiflexion.

It’s a questionable strategy to squat with the blocks under your heels, but it may train you into a better motor pattern until you resolve your dorsiflexion problem.

​Research that backs this up...

Now onto the nitty gritty ​that backs ​up all of the above!

Ankle dorsiflexion with flexed and extended knee has been found correlate significantly with squat depth, accounting for 38.8 and 23.7% of the variance in male and female subjects, respectively (p<0.05).

Hemmerich et al. (2006) reported that the average ankle dorsiflexion angle required was 38.5 ±5.9° during a squat. This is because the ankle is an important part of the closed-chain movement during deep squatting activities, limited mobility and stability of the ankle joint could inhibit performance of the proximal joints.

Boys Vs Girls

An important part to also mention is the slight variation that has been found between genders. The    ROM    of    the    ankle    dorsiflexion is a major factor affecting squat depth in both genders, followed by the hip flexion ROM in  male  and  actually ankle  dorsiflexor  strength  in  females.

For Further reading

Kim, S. H., Kwon, O. Y., Park, K. N., Jeon, I. C., & Weon, J. H. (2015). Lower extremity strength and the range of motion in relation to squat depth. Journal of human kinetics, 45(1), 59-69.

Hemmerich A, Brown H, Smith S, Marthandam SS, Wyss UP. Hip, knee, and anklekinematics of high range of motion activities of daily living. J Orthop Res, 2006; 24: 770-781 Equipment for squatting

​What to do if my dorsiflexion is lacking?

​You can book a session in with me, where I can tailor a plan not just to help your dorislfexion  but help with all the other movements and joints that help form a perfect squat.

Alternatively wait till next week where I give some advice on improving your dorsiflexion

​Lastly in the near future i'll be starting skype sessions to go 1v1 anywhere in the world to help tailor a plan to you, subscribe below to find out when this will be launching!​

Click Below To Book In Today!


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