Fully Fit Therapy

"Getting you Fully Fit From Home"

7 Things Not To Do When Experiencing Lower Back Pain


1. Don’t just sit or lie down, it may seem like that’s the best thing for it however it wreaks havoc down the line. Keep moving around to the best of your ability as it will keep your muscles strong and keep you mobile.


2. On the other hand don’t work through the pain. You may think this contradicts my first point… however  if it REALLY hurts, don’t do it, do the movements that are manageable.


​3. Don't do exercises such as shoulder presses, other overhead movements ​and even weighted squats, add an increase of stress to the spine and shouldn’t be done when you have back pain.

​4. Don’t slouch! If you slouch, spend a lot of time sat down at a desk or in the car practice. Sitting up straight and even standing up straight! Really easy, open your shoulders and chest up.


​5. Toe touches – these place a great stress on your disks on ligaments in your back and potentially can worsen your pain.


​6. Don't Jog or run! Both just like toe touches put and increase in stress and strain on your lower back,  potentially increasing pain.


​7. While it is  great to try to manage the pain yourself, the earlier you start treatment, the better your chances are of making a smooth recovery and quickly returning to normal function.

This is due to whilst being in pain you change how you move which means muscles, joints and tendons start performing differently leading to worse pain.

​What To Do Next?


Now you know what not to do, next click the link down below to get my 5 Principles of Lower Back Pain!

These Principles​ will guide you step by step how to become pain free!

Download 5 Principles of Back Pain Ebook

​About Fully Fit Therapy


​Rob Manning

​Owner Of Fully Fit Therapy

Robert Manning graduated from the University of Gloucestershire with BSc Hons in Sports Therapy. Having had placements with the GB Youth Ice Hockey team, with Cirencester FC for pre-season fitness, Newport Gwent Dragons and the All Golds Rugby team.


​Since graduating Rob set up Fully Fit Therapy with the Number one aim of helping people become more mobile and pain free!

 

1. Don’t just sit or lie down, it may seem like that’s the best thing for it however it wreaks havoc down the line. Keep moving around to the best of your ability as it will keep your muscles strong and keep you mobile.

 

2. On the other hand don’t work through the pain. You may think this contradicts my first point… however  if it REALLY hurts, don’t do it, do the movements that are manageable.

 

​3. Don't do exercises such as shoulder presses, other overhead movements ​and even weighted squats, add an increase of stress to the spine and shouldn’t be done when you have back pain.

​4. Don’t slouch! If you slouch, spend a lot of time sat down at a desk or in the car practice. Sitting up straight and even standing up straight! Really easy, open your shoulders and chest up.

 

​5. Toe touches – these place a great stress on your disks on ligaments in your back and potentially can worsen your pain.

 

​6. Don't Jog or run! Both just like toe touches put and increase in stress and strain on your lower back,  potentially increasing pain.

 

​7. While it is  great to try to manage the pain yourself, the earlier you start treatment, the better your chances are of making a smooth recovery and quickly returning to normal function.

This is due to whilst being in pain you change how you move which means muscles, joints and tendons start performing differently leading to worse pain.

​What To Do Next?

 

Now you know what not to do, next click the link down below to get my 5 Principles of Lower Back Pain!

These Principles​ will guide you step by step how to become pain free!

Download 5 Principles of Back Pain Ebook

​About Fully Fit Therapy

​Rob Manning

​Owner Of Fully Fit Therapy

Robert Manning graduated from the University of Gloucestershire with BSc Hons in Sports Therapy. Having had placements with the GB Youth Ice Hockey team, with Cirencester FC for pre-season fitness, Newport Gwent Dragons and the All Golds Rugby team.

​Since graduating Rob set up Fully Fit Therapy with the Number one aim of helping people become more mobile and pain free!

Help my tension headache


What is a Tension Headache?


A tension headache is the most common type of headache. It can cause mild, moderate, or intense pain in your head, neck, and behind your eyes.

Some people say that a tension headache feels like a tight band around their forehead. Alternatively, sometimes it can feel at the back of your skull, just above your hairline

​Complications


Because tension headaches are so common, their effect on job productivity and overall quality of life is considerable, particularly if they're chronic headaches. 

The frequent pain from these headaches may render you unable to attend socials, the gym and even work. If you do manage to make it to work your ability to do your job to 100% may very well be impaired.

Lifestyle and Treatments

1. Down time, ice packs or a long and hot shower may be all you need to relieve a tension headache in the short term. A variety of strategies can help reduce the severity and frequency of chronic tension headaches without resorting to pain killers.

​2. One way is to manage your stress level. A great way to help reduce stress is by planning ahead and organizing your day thoroughly. Another way is to allow more time to relax and have some me time even if it’s just for 20 minutes. If you're caught in a stressful situation, consider stepping back.

​3.Perfect your posture. Good posture can help keep your muscles from tensing. When standing, hold your shoulders back and your head level. Pull in your abdomen and buttocks. When sitting, make sure your thighs are parallel to the ground and your head isn't slumped forward.

Safety first, please: severe headaches often need medical investigation

​​

​When to see a Doctor!


There are many other types of less common headaches — literally hundreds and hundreds of them — and some of them have serious medical causes. Headaches can be their own problem (primary), or they can be a symptom of something else. You need medical assessment if your headaches are:


  • unusually persistent, more than a day at higher pain levels, more than a week at moderate pain levels)
  • unusually sudden, a so-called “thunderclap” headache, which comes on in seconds to minutes
  • unusual in any other way associated with other worrisome symptoms
  • ​Medication

    You can take over-the-counter pain medications, such ibuprofen to get rid of a tension headache. 
    However, these should only be used occasionally and you ​should not become dependent on this.
    ​ Using over-the-counter medications too much may lead to “overuse” or “rebound” headaches. These types of headaches occur when you become so accustomed to a medication that you experience pain when the drugs wear off .

    ​Hydration

    Hydration and headaches: don’t get too thirsty, but don’t worry about it too much either!

    It’s also a just about the easiest possible treatment to test: just drink a couple glasses of water! The blood pressure changes that should make a difference take place quite quickly.

     If your headache is dehydration-powered to any significant degree, you’ll feel a lot better fast, within 20 minutes

    ​Headache Diary!

    ​A headache diary can help you determine the cause of your tension headaches. Record your daily meals, ​drinks, activities, and any situations that trigger stress. For each day that you have a tension headache, make a note of it. After several weeks or months, you may be able to make a connection. For example, if your journal shows that headaches occurred on days when you ate a particular food, this food may be your trigger.

    ​Would You Like More Help??


    ​Watch my trailer below for a quick look at my 3 part series on Tensions Headaches.

    In my series I go through step by step instructions with stretches, exercises and meditation techniques to make your Tension Headaches a thing of the past!!

    ​Like what you see then click here to take your first step in becoming Tension Headache free NATURALLY!



    ​Rob Manning

    ​Owner Of Fully Fit Therapy

    ​" I created this 3 part series to help people like yourself to stop having to take paracetamol every time you had a headache! 


    ​It is simple and easy to follow videos, starting off with basic exercises and then going into more advanced ones "

    What Supplements Should I Take?

    A few of my clients have recently been asking about supplements and what they take to what I would recommend. I thought instead of just telling them I’d make a blog post to give a good overview of supplements to show how with a lot of them it’s not all what they’re crack up to be.

    But first what a supplements and what can they do??

    ​Definition Of Supplements


    There is no single definition for a supplement, however the closest one is:

    A food component, nutrient, non-food compound that is taken repeatedly with a regular diet, with the aim to hit a goal.

    Quite vague isn’t it!


    But  I hear you say 'I don’t care about its definition….what does supplements for me!?'

    Supplements can contribute to all round good health and sport performance, this is because:

    • They can give a required intake of specific nutrients
    • Provide energy and Macros that would be hard via food alone.
    • Can increase performance e.g. lift heavier, jumper further or sprint for longer!
    • Alter the physique e.g. increase muscle mass
    • Decrease pain
    • Decrease recovery time


    All of the above sounds great doesn’t it, who doesn’t want to be increase performance, have a better body and have all round good health….

    Unfortunately when you look a little deeper research is actually quite scarce and when you can actually find some research lots of the outcomes are anecdotal and observations during trainings.

    ​Common Supplements in Athletes


    Examples of micronutrients often requiring supplementation in athletes are Calcium, Vitamin D and Iron.

    Calcium deficiency is usually due to missing out on dairy products or disorderly eating. These is no known indicator currently, however bone mineral density may play a part coupled with being Low in Vitamin D… I’ll get onto that next

    You can actually be at risk of Vitamin D insufficiency throughout the year. There is no agreement for the concentration of Vitamin D marker however the need for supplementation depends on the skin and  UVB exposure

    A non optimal iron status may result from limited iron intake, inadequate energy intake, or excess iron need due to rapid growth, high-altitude training, menstrual blood loss or excess iron lost in body fluids.

    There are several checks to do, these can be done simultaneously to pin point what stage of Iron deficiency you are at. If you are then found to be deficient then you may need supplemental iron at doses greater than their RDA (ie, >18 mg/day for women and >8 mg/day for men)


    Lastly calcium can need to be supplemented when an you’ve avoided dairy products or other foods that are high in calcium. Another issue potential cause for a lack of calcium is disorganised eating habits.

    Bone Density scan may indicate a chronically low amount of calcium, low Vitamin D levels have also been shown to be linked with low calcium levels.

    Calcium intakes of 1500 mg/day and 1500–2000 IU vitamin D are recommended to optimise bone health in athletes with low energy availability or menstrual dysfunction.

    ​Supplements For A Direct Increase in Performance


    A few performance-enhancing supplements might, at the present time,  be  considered  to  have  an  adequate  level  of  support  to  suggest that marginal performance gains may be possible. These supplements  include  caffeine,  creatine  (in  the  form  of  creatine  monohydrate),  nitrate,  sodium  bicarbonate  and  possibly  also  Beta-alanine.

    When using supplements you should trial them thoroughly first, ideally mimic training on what that would be like in competition! You’d then need to weigh up the positives and negatives of the supplement to see if it is worth future use.


    Details of these supplements are below:

    1. Caffeine is a stimulant that possesses well-established benefits for performance across endurance-based situations, and short-term repeated sprint tasks.

    3-6 mg/kg BM is the recommended dosage, taken about 60 minutes prior to exercise.

    9 mg/kg or above doesn’t cause performance to increase and can cause negative side effects such as insomnia, anxiety and nausea


    2. Creatine can help improve performance in high intensity repeated exercise, think football, rugby etc.

     It can also increase lean mass during resistance or interval training programmes.

    A loading phase of 20g/day (taken in four 5 grams doses for 5-7 days and once this is done, switch to maintenance which is between 3 and 5g a day.

    Performance benefits from creatine are lean mass gains, muscular strength and power with an increase in acute performance of high intensity exercises which lasts 30 seconds or less.

    No negative health effects have been noted with long term use(1 study has assessed this over a four year period)

    The only sport related issue is due to creatine increasing water retention it maybe detrimental to sports such as pole vault (where body mass has to be moved against gravity) or where you need to stick to a specific body mass target


    3. Beta-alanine, the thoughts behind this is that it helps increase sustained  high intensity exercise as it helps produce carnosine. Carnosine helps as it is able to reduce lactic acid build up helping you to exercise at high intensity for longer!!

    Dosage for this is recommended to be 65 mg/kg BM and taken every 3-4 hours as a split dose e.g 0.8 to 1.2g over 12 weeks.

    Increase in performance is small, but potentially meaningful with increases of 0.2 to 3% in performance. ​Reasons to not supplement are that the supplements effectiveness is harder to see if you are well trained already.

    Large variations in carnosine production has been reported between studies and that authors state that further investigation is needed for for practical implications in sport.

    So take Beta-alanine and it’s benefits with a slight pinch of salt.

    ​If however you decide to,  side effects can be skin rashes and or transient paraesthesia

    ​Supplements for an In-Direct Effect on Performance


    Multiple supplements claim to be able to aid your health, ability to train hard, recover, adapt, repair from injury and stop muscle soreness. A particular area is our immune system where becoming ill can drastically impact training programmes and competitions.

    The most promising supplements for helping prevent illness  is Vitamin D.

    Vitamin C however is great for periods of heavy exertion.

    It’s zinc however if it is too late and you are starting to get symptoms.

    An important note to make is that high doses of vitamin C has been found to reduced training adaptations.

    ​Supplements For Immune Health


    Vitamin D-

    This is essential for immunity and is know to influence several aspects of it. Our skin exposure to sunlight (aka vitamin D) accounts to 90% of our intake. This explains why in the winter months it is relatively easy to have less than we need!

    Vitamin C

    There is moderate research that vitamin C supplementation helps reduce the possibility of colds, sneezes and runny noses. However once you are coughing etc taking >200mg a day of it doesn’t help. Therefore don’t go loading up on orange juice once your cold has started!

    ​Gaining & Losing Body Mass

    When gaining, Protein is the one main supplement that comes to mind. Thankfully there is a lot of science backing proteins effects of putting on mass when mixed in with resistance training.

    Evidence for ‘fat burning’ supplements is far from being conclusive and there is a complete and absence of evidence of this effectiveness for many of these supplements.

    Examples of these include green tea and omega 3 which studies have found them to have only a small to trivial effect on fat loss.

    ​Conclusion!

    ​Supplements can  play  a  small  role  in  an  athlete’s  sports  nutrition  plan,  with  products  that  include  essential  micronutrients,  performance  supplements  and  health  supplements. All of these potentially providing benefits to you and I.

    Some  supplements,  when  used  appropriately,  may  help  you  to  meet  sports  nutrition  goals,  to train  harder,  and  stay  healthy  and  injury-free.  Only few supplements can directly enhance competition performance. 

    It  takes  a lot of  effort  and  expert knowledge to identify which supplements are appropriate, how to integrate them into the your nutrition plan, and  how  to  ensure  that  any  benefits  outweigh  potential  negative  side  effects.

    To work out the potential positives and benefits this analysis would be best done with an input of a well-informed sports nutrition professional.


    For Additional information visit Br J Sports Med. 2018 Apr;52(7):439-455. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099027. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

    Marathon Tips Part 2

    Now with the London Marathon withing Touching distance here is part 2 of my top tips for running a marathon....


    11.

    Think Laps in laps, Not Miles

    Instead of obsessing about each one of the 26 miles, look at each three mile segment as a lap, this makes it more manageable mentally. To concentrate on every mile would be like paying attention to the speedometer for a 3 hour drive.

    12.

    Drink Early & Often

     Take sports drink at the first aid station and every one after. Taking in carbohydrates and fluid early will help postpone or prevent serious dehydration or carbohydrate depletion later, so you’ll be a lot more likely to be able to keep at your desired pace.

    During prolonged exercise, our thirst mechanism isn’t able to keep up with our actual needs. Then, as you become dehydrated, less oxygen ​ is delivered to working muscles, causing you to run slower!

    13. Push Later On

    No matter how much you’re itching to go and set off quick, keep things under control until well past the halfway mark of the race

    ​Once past this mark, you can aim to increase your pace. If you feel relatively good at 18 miles, you’re down to eight miles to go, so if you’re still fresh, you can approach it mentally like a shorter race.


    14. Enjoy it!!

    Why do we do most things in life?? because we enjoy it!  + you have made a great donation to your chosen charity!

    Soak up the atmosphere and your surroundings before the race, during it with the crowds and at the end.​


    So there you go, my top tips for running a marathon (primarily the London Marathon)

    If you'd like a last minute session before or a session after feel free to get in touch! 07759689612 or mail me via the contact form on the contact page!

    Enjoy the race!​

    Marathon Tips Part 1

    ​With the London Marathon fast approaching I thought it was only right to give out my tops tips for helping get your best time possible!

    You don't have to follow all of my tips but maybe just implement 1 or 2 into the last few weeks of your training routine.


    ​1. If possible, start doing runs on the same topography as the marathon. For example, go up and down lots of hills if you’re running New York City.

    As this is all about the London Marathon, this is a flat and fast course. Therefore you want to run on flat routes in the lead up to as you’ll be using the same muscles for the whole race.


    ​2.Drink on the Run

    Practice during your remaining long and semi-long runs with the sports drink and energy gels you intend to refuel with during the race

    If you are a serious racer and or have picky stomachs you should be using the sports drink that will be available on the race course. You also want to find out how often your marathon will have aid stations, and practice drinking at that rate.

    If you don’t run with fluids, place bottles along your training route.


    ​3. Dress the part (all the gear but a good idea)

    Don’t run in a cotton t-shirt, you’ll prefer it and perform so much better in a running top!

    A couple of weeks before, you want to go for a run in it to make sure it does not irritate your skin!


    ​4. Clockwork

    If you can, run at the same time of day as the start of your marathon. This way, your body’s rhythms–including the all-important bathroom routine– will be in sync with your marathon needs come race day. The more often you can do this, the better, but try for at least the last three days before the race!


    5. Run a Dress Rehearsal

    Four or five days before the marathon, do a two- or three-mile marathon-pace run in your marathon outfit and shoes. Picture yourself on the course running strong and relaxed. Besides boosting your confidence, this run will provide one last little bit of conditioning and will help you lock in to race pace on marathon day.


    6. Chill

    Reduce the outside stresses in your life as much as possible for the last week of training!

    Try to have your work projects under control, politely decline invitations to late nights out with friends and family etc.

     Most of all, put your feet up!

    Save museum tours and trips outs for after the marathon, and don’t spend four hours the day before shopping for a post marathon treat to yourself!


    7. Set Two Goals

    Review your training and set one goal for a good race day, and another as a backup plan in case it’s hot or windy or you’re just not feeling great,”.

     So many things can go wrong in a marathon, from a blister at the half way point or just not feeling great the day of the race.

    Therefore you need that secondary goal to stay motivated if things aren’t perfect, which they rarely are.


    So that's the first part of my marathon tips!

    If you'd like more information, help or to book a last minute session feel free to give me a call on 07759689612.


    The 3 Types Of Recovery

    The relationship between recovery and fatigue and its impact on performance has attracted the interest of  sports  science for  many years. 

    An  good balance between stress  (training  and competition  load,  other  life  demands)  and  recovery is  essential for  athletes to achieve continuous high-level performance

    Recovery is an umbrella term which can be further characterized by different techniques of recovery such as regeneration or psychological recovery strategies.

    Regeneration in sport and exercise refers to the physiological aspect of recovery and ideally follows  fatigue induced by training or competition. Cold water immersion and sleep is a common recovery strategy for this.

    In contrast there is also mental fatigue, this can be recovered by cognitive Self-regulation, resource activation, and psychological relaxation techniques (think meditation).




    ​​Recovery can be broken down into 3 types, passive, active and pro-active recovery.

    1. An example of passive recovery is a service I offer which is massage coupled with PNF stretching.

    2. An example Active recovery is cool down jogging the idea behind this is that it compensates for the metabolic response of physical fatigue.

    3. For proactive recovery, this is a mixture of both of the above and using them as part of your weekly training sessions e.g. a weekly massage or using compression garments after training.


    Fatigue isn’t all bad, this is because, a certain degree of fatigue is needed as this causes functional overreaching- (this is required to improve performance).

    If you would like more help with recovery and/or would like to book a session passive recovery give me a ring on 07759689612 or email me at [email protected]​.

     I’ll be happy to help with any queries and to book you in.

    ​ Testimonial

    Injury Treatment review


    ​L. Brymner

    ​Recreational Gym User

    ​​I had suffered a bad strain from the gym in my upper back trap area and was very immobile and causing me tension headaches. Rob managed to source the problem and relieve some of the soreness and get me on the road to recovery my back and neck were back too 100% within a couple of days and I was back in the gym, could not recommend rob more if you've got any pains or long lasting injuries I'd highly suggest you see Rob! Lewis

    The relationship between recovery and fatigue and its impact on performance has attracted the interest of  sports  science for  many years. 

    An  good balance between stress  (training  and competition  load,  other  life  demands)  and  recovery is  essential for  athletes to achieve continuous high-level performance

    Recovery is an umbrella term which can be further characterized by different techniques of recovery such as regeneration or psychological recovery strategies.

    Regeneration in sport and exercise refers to the physiological aspect of recovery and ideally follows  fatigue induced by training or competition. Cold water immersion and sleep is a common recovery strategy for this.

    In contrast there is also mental fatigue, this can be recovered by cognitive Self-regulation, resource activation, and psychological relaxation techniques (think meditation).

    ​​Recovery can be broken down into 3 types, passive, active and pro-active recovery.

    1. An example of passive recovery is a service I offer which is massage coupled with PNF stretching.

    2. An example Active recovery is cool down jogging the idea behind this is that it compensates for the metabolic response of physical fatigue.

    3. For proactive recovery, this is a mixture of both of the above and using them as part of your weekly training sessions e.g. a weekly massage or using compression garments after training.

    Fatigue isn’t all bad, this is because, a certain degree of fatigue is needed as this causes functional overreaching- (this is required to improve performance).

    If you would like more help with recovery and/or would like to book a session passive recovery give me a ring on 07759689612 or email me at [email protected]​.

     I’ll be happy to help with any queries and to book you in.

    ​ Testimonial

    Injury Treatment review

    ​L. Brymner

    ​Recreational Gym User

    ​​I had suffered a bad strain from the gym in my upper back trap area and was very immobile and causing me tension headaches. Rob managed to source the problem and relieve some of the soreness and get me on the road to recovery my back and neck were back too 100% within a couple of days and I was back in the gym, could not recommend rob more if you've got any pains or long lasting injuries I'd highly suggest you see Rob! Lewis

    Fit For February Offer

    ​Have you got your new years resolution fitness resolutions off to a good start and looking to maintain it if not improve it?

    ​Alternatively are you starting to get a niggle or some aches and pains coming on from starting off so far in 2018?

    Or lastly are you struggling with stress from the New Year?

    Well you are in luck, I can help with all of the above and more!

    Be it rehabilitation and pre-habilitation (think preparing to not get an injury)​ plans and treatment, all individually tailored to you.

    If you just want to get rid of stress I can instead tailor a Sports and Swedish massage to you.

    Most importantly I will help you set goals that we can track​ together.

    Below is a couple of testimonials from clients i've helped... My next testimonial could be from you!

    ​Testimonials

    Injury Treatment review


    ​L. Brymner


    ​​I had suffered a bad strain from the gym in my upper back trap area and was very immobile and causing me tension headaches. Rob managed to source the problem and relieve some of the soreness and get me on the road to recovery my back and neck were back too 100% within a couple of days and I was back in the gym, could not recommend rob more if you've got any pains or long lasting injuries I'd highly suggest you see Rob! Lewis


    ​T. Doteva


    ​I had excruciating neck pain that was going down through my left shoulder to the lower back. In three sessions Rob managed to improve my condition tremendously. In addition, he examined and corrected my posture and recommended exercises to do, so to prevent further injuries. I'm very grateful! Thank you Rob!


    To book in with me now and get your initial assessment and follow up with £10 off call me on 07759689612 or email me at [email protected]!


    If you're still unsure about booking in with me I now offer free 15 minute consultations over the phone to see if sports therapy is right for you. To arrange one contact me by phone or email and I'll be happy to sort one out for you


    Shred Snow, Not Your Body!

    Are you planning or have already booked a trip to the slopes? If so, are you prepared? I am not referring to your purchase of the latest ‘look’ to cruise the slopes in style or working out the best Apres ski spots. I am referring to yourself!

    Your body, is it prepared and ready to take on the physical demands of skiing or snowboarding to return home without a cast and or crutches? Alpine skiing and snowboarding are classified as very extreme sports due to the involvement of high speeds and an increased propensity for participants to jump and perform acrobatic maneuvers (as seen on TV think The Jump on channel 4).

    There are risks involved when participating in snow sports. Alpine skiing and snowboarding take place in environments where medical care may not be readily available on site. Because of these challenges, greater emphasis needs to be placed on skill, preparation, and safety strategies/equipment to prevent serious injury.

    I would hope the only time you ride in the chopper is for a scenic flip or heli-ski and not a rescue off the mountain to the local hospital! Before travelling triple check your medical insurance includes extreme sports, as if not you better get an upgrade to it!

    In both skiing and snowboarding, the leading cause of death and catastrophic injury is traumatic brain injury (TBI). Head injuries and concussions account for 25 to 30% of injuries, with one of the most high profile cases in recent years being none other than Michael Schumacher springing to mind.  Musculoskeletal injuries are far more common, albeit less serious.

    When skiing you are at greater risk of sustaining an injury to your lower limb; most commonly knee injuries like tearing the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) or sprains and tears to the collateral ligaments of the knee. Snowboarders on the other hand sustain most injuries to their upper limb; frequently sprains or fractures to the hand and wrist or shoulder dislocations.  

    Thankfully however it’s not all doom and gloom. Wearing a helmet and being physically prepared for your trip can significantly reduce your risk of injury. There are also many benefits to a skiing holiday, not only is it fun and being outdoors enjoying the beauty of your natural surroundings is good for your soul and mental outlook. But undoubtedly the physical exertion is great exercise for your musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. These tips can help make your winter wonderland wicked rather than weary and wounded!

    Why not start your holiday in tip top condition? If you know you have a knee or back niggle visit my self for some hands-on treatments and exercise prescription so you can enjoy your trip without any flare-ups. I can also prescribe strengthening exercises for your knees and quadriceps muscles (thigh muscles); the stronger they are the better they can absorb the impacts of skiing and snowboarding without injury.

    Yoga, Pilates and core strengthening will protect your back and improve your balance which again may save you from a tumble and subsequent injury. In addition to this being physically fit will make your skiing better and more enjoyable. Injuries often occur later in the day when fatigue sets in and concentration levels starts to drop. The fitter you are the longer you will be able to stay out on the slopes without increasing your injury risk. Ask your physical therapist for advice on aerobic training leading up to your holiday.

    Fortunately, most snow sport injuries can be treated with rest, bracing, pain medication and Sports Therapist. Some more severe fractures and ligament tears may require surgical intervention where recovery periods can vary from 3 to 6 months, and necessitate intensive rehabilitation. So, remember, on returning from your trip, should you have any sprains or strains get treatment early, rather than waiting to see if it will resolve itself. Early treatment and rehabilitation of an injury guarantees better long term outcomes. Chronic pain is a serious condition that can become complex and frustratingly stubborn to manage and overcome.

    I’ve put together a guide called “6 Strategies for Avoiding Injury on the Slopes” and it’s accompanied by two leaflets with videos, containing six power exercises for either snowboarding or skiing. To download the leaflet click here

    A skiing holiday is great fun, and these risks shouldn’t deter you from going and enjoying your time. Use these tips to get better prepared and stay injury free.

    Lastly I hope you enjoy your snow holiday, if you would like more information on exercises to help before you go or to book a session. Just give me a call on 07759689612 or drop me an email at [email protected]. I look forward to hearing from you

    Are you planning or have already booked a trip to the slopes? If so, are you prepared? I am not referring to your purchase of the latest ‘look’ to cruise the slopes in style or working out the best Apres ski spots. I am referring to yourself!

    Your body, is it prepared and ready to take on the physical demands of skiing or snowboarding to return home without a cast and or crutches? Alpine skiing and snowboarding are classified as very extreme sports due to the involvement of high speeds and an increased propensity for participants to jump and perform acrobatic maneuvers (as seen on TV think The Jump on channel 4).

    There are risks involved when participating in snow sports. Alpine skiing and snowboarding take place in environments where medical care may not be readily available on site. Because of these challenges, greater emphasis needs to be placed on skill, preparation, and safety strategies/equipment to prevent serious injury.

    I would hope the only time you ride in the chopper is for a scenic flip or heli-ski and not a rescue off the mountain to the local hospital! Before travelling triple check your medical insurance includes extreme sports, as if not you better get an upgrade to it!

    In both skiing and snowboarding, the leading cause of death and catastrophic injury is traumatic brain injury (TBI). Head injuries and concussions account for 25 to 30% of injuries, with one of the most high profile cases in recent years being none other than Michael Schumacher springing to mind.  Musculoskeletal injuries are far more common, albeit less serious.

    When skiing you are at greater risk of sustaining an injury to your lower limb; most commonly knee injuries like tearing the ACL (anterior cruciate ligament) or sprains and tears to the collateral ligaments of the knee. Snowboarders on the other hand sustain most injuries to their upper limb; frequently sprains or fractures to the hand and wrist or shoulder dislocations.  

    Thankfully however it’s not all doom and gloom. Wearing a helmet and being physically prepared for your trip can significantly reduce your risk of injury. There are also many benefits to a skiing holiday, not only is it fun and being outdoors enjoying the beauty of your natural surroundings is good for your soul and mental outlook. But undoubtedly the physical exertion is great exercise for your musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems. These tips can help make your winter wonderland wicked rather than weary and wounded!

    Why not start your holiday in tip top condition? If you know you have a knee or back niggle visit my self for some hands-on treatments and exercise prescription so you can enjoy your trip without any flare-ups. I can also prescribe strengthening exercises for your knees and quadriceps muscles (thigh muscles); the stronger they are the better they can absorb the impacts of skiing and snowboarding without injury.

    Yoga, Pilates and core strengthening will protect your back and improve your balance which again may save you from a tumble and subsequent injury. In addition to this being physically fit will make your skiing better and more enjoyable. Injuries often occur later in the day when fatigue sets in and concentration levels starts to drop. The fitter you are the longer you will be able to stay out on the slopes without increasing your injury risk. Ask your physical therapist for advice on aerobic training leading up to your holiday.

    Fortunately, most snow sport injuries can be treated with rest, bracing, pain medication and Sports Therapist. Some more severe fractures and ligament tears may require surgical intervention where recovery periods can vary from 3 to 6 months, and necessitate intensive rehabilitation. So, remember, on returning from your trip, should you have any sprains or strains get treatment early, rather than waiting to see if it will resolve itself. Early treatment and rehabilitation of an injury guarantees better long term outcomes. Chronic pain is a serious condition that can become complex and frustratingly stubborn to manage and overcome.

    I’ve put together a guide called “6 Strategies for Avoiding Injury on the Slopes” and it’s accompanied by two leaflets with videos, containing six power exercises for either snowboarding or skiing. To download the leaflet click here

    A skiing holiday is great fun, and these risks shouldn’t deter you from going and enjoying your time. Use these tips to get better prepared and stay injury free.

    Lastly I hope you enjoy your snow holiday, if you would like more information on exercises to help before you go or to book a session. Just give me a call on 07759689612 or drop me an email at [email protected]. I look forward to hearing from you

    New Years Resolution 101

    Yes it’s that time of year again. Christmas has been and gone, and now the New Year is here when people make their resolutions.

    Some people’s maybe to race the London Marathon,  others may want to get the beach body they have always talked about or it could be to just to give thanks more often.


    When you see your friends in the pub telling you this, probably even last night, how many people do you think will actually get that body or run that race? Research actually suggests that only around 8% of people complete their new year’s resolutions. Is there a reason for this?


    Goals for New Years like the two above tend to be very vague. ‘I will race the London Marathon’ sounds like a pretty good goal doesn’t it? They apply, get accepted, but with no immediate goals to aim for it become very easy to drop behind on the preparation and training. They end up completing the race, but find it extremely difficult and quite possibly pick up an injury.


    Could they have done better? Of course! If only they had made their goal more specific. A much better goal would have been to say ‘I want to enter the London Marathon, I am going to train for at least 2 times a week to begin with and I want to beat 5 hours.’ This resolution is much more specific and gives yourself a more tangible goal.

    SMART goal setting is one of the most widely used methods:

    S- SPECIFIC

    M- MEASURABLE


    A- ATTAINABLE


    R- RELEVANT(RESULTS)


    T- TIME ORIENTATED


    The ‘beach body for summer’ resolution is the same. It doesn’t give you a time to aim for, just ‘summer’, be SPECIFIC. ‘By June 12th I want to be size 10’ or ‘I want to have a body fat of 8%’, I will do this by going to the gym twice a week on Tuesdays and Thursdays. This makes each week a goal, and makes you more likely to keep it in the long term. Another way of keeping to your goals is by making it public and telling your friends and family, even keeping a blog on it or updating it daily on facebook.


    A few other tips for goal setting


    1. Plan in advance

    Try and make some sort of timetable of your week to then fit your goal in.


    2. Don’t put things off

    When you start thinking ‘i can skip today, it won’t matter’. DON’T. A 6 month goal is completed by REPEATING the daily basics


    3. Make it enjoyable

    If you don’t enjoy it, you won’t do it. There is more than one way of doing something. E.g. if you don’t like running on your own, find a running club.


    4. Don’t expect instant results


    5. Baby Steps


    There is nothing wrong with hoping to do an Ironman, when the only distance you have ran before is 5km. You should set your sight on first completing a half marathon. Keep the really big goals in the back of your head, as one day they will be closer than you think.


    Lastly the most important part of your goal/s is that you enjoy getting to the end product. I was directed to a video to do with goal setting, where it talks about how quickly the feeling of euphoria goes after completing a goal.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3bBk6oneqc&feature=youtu.be


    The cliff for the video boils down to:


    MAKE SURE ENJOY THE DAILY GRIND, COMPLETING THE END GOAL IS A BONUS


    Hope you all have had a good Christmas and a Great New Year!!

    My 5th Principle Of Lower Back Pain

    ​Gradually Progress Back to
    normal activity


    ​As progression is made in all other aspects of the rehabilitation process for lower back pain, there should be an eventual return to normal activities of daily life and even training.

    The exercises used should provide enough ​​​​stress to the body to adapt to higher demand but not so much as to hinder the healing process. 

    For this reason, returning to heavy training too soon can over stress healing structures and tissues, and delay the rehabilitation process. The volume and intensity of training should be slowly progressed in a step-by-step manner. Each person will return to his or her previous level of strength and performance at a different rate.


    So there you have it my 5 principles of lower back pain! Hope you can now apply it to yourself to help manage your pain and get you back to be Fully Fit! If you would like to book a session, have more help or even just some advice feel free to contact me and i'll be happy to help!

    As progression is made in all other aspects of the rehabilitation process for
    lower back pain, there should be an eventual return to normal activities of daily
    life and even training.
    The exercises used should provide enough
    stress to the body to adapt to higher
    demand but not so much as to hinder the
    healing process. For this reason, returning
    to heavy training too soon can overstress
    healing structures and tissues, and delay
    the rehabilitation process. The volume and
    intensity of training should be slowly
    progressed in a step-by-step manner. Each
    person will return to his or her previous
    level of strength and performance at a
    different rate.
    So there you have it my 5 principles of
    lower back pain! Hope you can now apply it to yourself to help manage your
    pain and get you back to be Fully Fit! If you would like to book a session, have
    more help or even just some advice just visit fullyfittherapy.co.uk
    Thanks for reading, speak soon- Rob
    5. Gradually Progress Back to
    normal activity
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