Fully Fit Therapy

"Getting you Fully Fit From Home"

Author: Robert Manning (page 1 of 7)

Help My Plantar Fasciitis

​Pain on the bottom of your foot?

Struggle walking, jogging or just being on your feet for long periods of time?

Well you could be suffering with Plantar Fasciitis​.

If this is you then below I have a great selection of videos for you. Firstly giving you a short explanation of what Plantar Fasciitis​

​What is Plantar Fasciitis

​Quick Fix Plantar Fasciitis

​Now you know a bit more about Plantar Fasciitis, the next two videos are all about how you you can get some instant pain relief. It can then open a window of opportunity then for a long term fix!

​Long Term Fix Plantar Fasciitis

​Now those exercises have given you some pain relief you can start the next exercises. These will help fix your arches and stop your foot pain for good.

Any questions about any of the exercises feel free to give me a message!

​How I Can Help You!

​Pain on the bottom of your foot?

Struggle walking, jogging or just being on your feet for long periods of time?

Well you could be suffering with Plantar Fasciitis​.

If this is you then below I have a great selection of videos for you. Firstly giving you a short explanation of what Plantar Fasciitis​

​What is Plantar Fasciitis

​Quick Fix Plantar Fasciitis

​Now you know a bit more about Plantar Fasciitis, the next two videos are all about how you you can get some instant pain relief. It can then open a window of opportunity then for a long term fix!

​Long Term Fix Plantar Fasciitis

​Now those exercises have given you some pain relief you can start the next exercises. These will help fix your arches and stop your foot pain for good.

Any questions about any of the exercises feel free to give me a message!

​How I Can Help You!

Forming Habits For Your New Years Resolutions

Continuing on from last weeks post about SMART goals and to hit actually hit them, you really need habits/systems in place to get you there.

SMART is a great way to set you up, but habits and systems is where you really get things done.


 So here are my top tips in forming habits:

​Your Environment


To make a good Habit you need to make it easy to do, this has a lot to do with the set-up of your environment.

If you want to go running every morning, lay your running gear out the night before. If you want to eat more fruit, make the fruit easily accessible by putting it out in a fruit bowl in the middle of the kitchen table.

A lot of what we do it down to ease and comfort, it’s why binge watching tv series on Netflix is so easy to get sucked into! As once you finish one episode the next one is starting, before you know it you’re 2 seasons in and it’s 3am!

If you want to stop a bad habit of yours all you need to do is the opposite and make it hard to do, but again you can change you environment to help you massively with this.

​Here are a few examples of changing bad habits…

​1. If you want to stop checking your phone so much, put it in another room whilst you work.

2. If you want to use your games console less, unplug it after each use and put it in a cupboard. This makes it a big effort for you to then get it out, plug it in and start to play and makes a book that you’ve left purposefully on your coffee table much more appealing and therefore more likely to be done.

​Habit Stacking


Another way of improving your habits is called Habit Stacking. The idea here is that you pick something you do already and then after you’ve done that habit you then introduce a new habit that you then want to do…

e.g. After I have my morning coffee (something you do already) I will do 5 minutes of Yoga (a new habit you want to pick up) Once this has done I will then get dressed into my work clothes but put the book I’m currently reading on my bed to read tonight (a new habit you want to pick up) so when you go to get into bed your book is already there.

The possibilities of this really are endless and the end result is that this because autonomous. ​This then eventually turns into a habit such as walking into a dark room and going straight for the light switch. That is how basic you can go with habits.

​Habit Stacking to Tracking


Tracking your habits is a sure way to improve your accountability and to keep it up in the long run. If you miss a day it’s not the end of the world, just start again the following day. The trick is not to let it snowball into 2 days missed, then 3 days missed etc etc.

Something to note however, is knowing when number tracking is good to use and also when not good to use… a great example is using your weight on the scales to track your progress .

The number on the scales might not be going down as fast as you’d like it to, so you could track other areas such as how much more energy you feel you have or how your skin is changing. The main point from this is that just because it’s measurable doesn’t mean you should use it!

​Baby Steps


This time of year everyone likes to go all out and make massive goals for ourselves and do everything at once. We’ve all heard people say I’m going to quit smoking, join the gym to lose 15 pounds take up a language and learn take that cooking course I always wanted.

99.9% of times doing all of this at once is just a recipe for disaster! If you were to do all that you’d 1. Be a completely different person to who you are now and 2. You’d last a few weeks at best and before you know it you’d be back in your old routines.

A way around all this is to pick 1 maybe 2 to focus on and start really small.

A substitute to taking French classes could be to download flashcards on your phone and do 2 minutes a day, slowly increasing your time spent doing them as the weeks progress.

Similar for the gym you could start doing a 5 minute workout at home to start getting you used to doing some light exercises. As with the French you could then slowly increase the amount of time spent on that task as you become more accustomed to it.

​One More Thing


Lastly one thing to remember with our habits, goals systems etc is that we often expect a straight line increase in progress the more we practice doing something.  In reality the results of our efforts are often delayed and only really come to show themselves months or even years down the line.

This can result in the early stages  of being stuck in what some people call ‘The valley of disappointment’ which is where you can feel discouraged and disheartened after putting in work for weeks and months but not seeing much if any returns on your efforts.

​You must always look to the bigger picture and know that the work was not wasted, it is just being stored and compounded as you put in the graft. It is only a lot later that the value of all your efforts is revealed!

Hope you got some good ideas from this post about how to go about making systems and habits that will propel yourselves towards your goals in 2019!

If you have any questions or want help with your habits or goals, don’t hesitate to message me and I’ll be happy to help! For further reading, the book I got this from is called Atomic Habits. What I told you only scratches the surface, so if you want to really dive into changing your habits and life I can’t recommend this book more highly.

Continuing on from last weeks post about SMART goals and to hit actually hit them, you really need habits/systems in place to get you there.

SMART is a great way to set you up, but habits and systems is where you really get things done.

 So here are my top tips in forming habits:

​Your Environment

To make a good Habit you need to make it easy to do, this has a lot to do with the set-up of your environment.

If you want to go running every morning, lay your running gear out the night before. If you want to eat more fruit, make the fruit easily accessible by putting it out in a fruit bowl in the middle of the kitchen table.

A lot of what we do it down to ease and comfort, it’s why binge watching tv series on Netflix is so easy to get sucked into! As once you finish one episode the next one is starting, before you know it you’re 2 seasons in and it’s 3am!

If you want to stop a bad habit of yours all you need to do is the opposite and make it hard to do, but again you can change you environment to help you massively with this.

​Here are a few examples of changing bad habits…

​1. If you want to stop checking your phone so much, put it in another room whilst you work.

2. If you want to use your games console less, unplug it after each use and put it in a cupboard. This makes it a big effort for you to then get it out, plug it in and start to play and makes a book that you’ve left purposefully on your coffee table much more appealing and therefore more likely to be done.

​Habit Stacking

Another way of improving your habits is called Habit Stacking. The idea here is that you pick something you do already and then after you’ve done that habit you then introduce a new habit that you then want to do…

e.g. After I have my morning coffee (something you do already) I will do 5 minutes of Yoga (a new habit you want to pick up) Once this has done I will then get dressed into my work clothes but put the book I’m currently reading on my bed to read tonight (a new habit you want to pick up) so when you go to get into bed your book is already there.

The possibilities of this really are endless and the end result is that this because autonomous. ​This then eventually turns into a habit such as walking into a dark room and going straight for the light switch. That is how basic you can go with habits.

​Habit Stacking to Tracking

Tracking your habits is a sure way to improve your accountability and to keep it up in the long run. If you miss a day it’s not the end of the world, just start again the following day. The trick is not to let it snowball into 2 days missed, then 3 days missed etc etc.

Something to note however, is knowing when number tracking is good to use and also when not good to use… a great example is using your weight on the scales to track your progress .

The number on the scales might not be going down as fast as you’d like it to, so you could track other areas such as how much more energy you feel you have or how your skin is changing. The main point from this is that just because it’s measurable doesn’t mean you should use it!

​Baby Steps

This time of year everyone likes to go all out and make massive goals for ourselves and do everything at once. We’ve all heard people say I’m going to quit smoking, join the gym to lose 15 pounds take up a language and learn take that cooking course I always wanted.

99.9% of times doing all of this at once is just a recipe for disaster! If you were to do all that you’d 1. Be a completely different person to who you are now and 2. You’d last a few weeks at best and before you know it you’d be back in your old routines.

A way around all this is to pick 1 maybe 2 to focus on and start really small.

A substitute to taking French classes could be to download flashcards on your phone and do 2 minutes a day, slowly increasing your time spent doing them as the weeks progress.

Similar for the gym you could start doing a 5 minute workout at home to start getting you used to doing some light exercises. As with the French you could then slowly increase the amount of time spent on that task as you become more accustomed to it.

​One More Thing

Lastly one thing to remember with our habits, goals systems etc is that we often expect a straight line increase in progress the more we practice doing something.  In reality the results of our efforts are often delayed and only really come to show themselves months or even years down the line.

This can result in the early stages  of being stuck in what some people call ‘The valley of disappointment’ which is where you can feel discouraged and disheartened after putting in work for weeks and months but not seeing much if any returns on your efforts.

​You must always look to the bigger picture and know that the work was not wasted, it is just being stored and compounded as you put in the graft. It is only a lot later that the value of all your efforts is revealed!

Hope you got some good ideas from this post about how to go about making systems and habits that will propel yourselves towards your goals in 2019!

If you have any questions or want help with your habits or goals, don’t hesitate to message me and I’ll be happy to help! For further reading, the book I got this from is called Atomic Habits. What I told you only scratches the surface, so if you want to really dive into changing your habits and life I can’t recommend this book more highly.

New Years Resolution 101

7 Things Not To Do When Experiencing Lower Back Pain

Help my tension headache

What Supplements Should I Take?

A few of my clients have recently been asking about supplements and what they take to what I would recommend. I thought instead of just telling them I’d make a blog post to give a good overview of supplements to show how with a lot of them it’s not all what they’re crack up to be.

But first what a supplements and what can they do??

​Definition Of Supplements


There is no single definition for a supplement, however the closest one is:

A food component, nutrient, non-food compound that is taken repeatedly with a regular diet, with the aim to hit a goal.

Quite vague isn’t it!


But  I hear you say 'I don’t care about its definition….what does supplements for me!?'

Supplements can contribute to all round good health and sport performance, this is because:

  • They can give a required intake of specific nutrients
  • Provide energy and Macros that would be hard via food alone.
  • Can increase performance e.g. lift heavier, jumper further or sprint for longer!
  • Alter the physique e.g. increase muscle mass
  • Decrease pain
  • Decrease recovery time


All of the above sounds great doesn’t it, who doesn’t want to be increase performance, have a better body and have all round good health….

Unfortunately when you look a little deeper research is actually quite scarce and when you can actually find some research lots of the outcomes are anecdotal and observations during trainings.

​Common Supplements in Athletes


Examples of micronutrients often requiring supplementation in athletes are Calcium, Vitamin D and Iron.

Calcium deficiency is usually due to missing out on dairy products or disorderly eating. These is no known indicator currently, however bone mineral density may play a part coupled with being Low in Vitamin D… I’ll get onto that next

You can actually be at risk of Vitamin D insufficiency throughout the year. There is no agreement for the concentration of Vitamin D marker however the need for supplementation depends on the skin and  UVB exposure

A non optimal iron status may result from limited iron intake, inadequate energy intake, or excess iron need due to rapid growth, high-altitude training, menstrual blood loss or excess iron lost in body fluids.

There are several checks to do, these can be done simultaneously to pin point what stage of Iron deficiency you are at. If you are then found to be deficient then you may need supplemental iron at doses greater than their RDA (ie, >18 mg/day for women and >8 mg/day for men)


Lastly calcium can need to be supplemented when an you’ve avoided dairy products or other foods that are high in calcium. Another issue potential cause for a lack of calcium is disorganised eating habits.

Bone Density scan may indicate a chronically low amount of calcium, low Vitamin D levels have also been shown to be linked with low calcium levels.

Calcium intakes of 1500 mg/day and 1500–2000 IU vitamin D are recommended to optimise bone health in athletes with low energy availability or menstrual dysfunction.

​Supplements For A Direct Increase in Performance


A few performance-enhancing supplements might, at the present time,  be  considered  to  have  an  adequate  level  of  support  to  suggest that marginal performance gains may be possible. These supplements  include  caffeine,  creatine  (in  the  form  of  creatine  monohydrate),  nitrate,  sodium  bicarbonate  and  possibly  also  Beta-alanine.

When using supplements you should trial them thoroughly first, ideally mimic training on what that would be like in competition! You’d then need to weigh up the positives and negatives of the supplement to see if it is worth future use.


Details of these supplements are below:

1. Caffeine is a stimulant that possesses well-established benefits for performance across endurance-based situations, and short-term repeated sprint tasks.

3-6 mg/kg BM is the recommended dosage, taken about 60 minutes prior to exercise.

9 mg/kg or above doesn’t cause performance to increase and can cause negative side effects such as insomnia, anxiety and nausea


2. Creatine can help improve performance in high intensity repeated exercise, think football, rugby etc.

 It can also increase lean mass during resistance or interval training programmes.

A loading phase of 20g/day (taken in four 5 grams doses for 5-7 days and once this is done, switch to maintenance which is between 3 and 5g a day.

Performance benefits from creatine are lean mass gains, muscular strength and power with an increase in acute performance of high intensity exercises which lasts 30 seconds or less.

No negative health effects have been noted with long term use(1 study has assessed this over a four year period)

The only sport related issue is due to creatine increasing water retention it maybe detrimental to sports such as pole vault (where body mass has to be moved against gravity) or where you need to stick to a specific body mass target


3. Beta-alanine, the thoughts behind this is that it helps increase sustained  high intensity exercise as it helps produce carnosine. Carnosine helps as it is able to reduce lactic acid build up helping you to exercise at high intensity for longer!!

Dosage for this is recommended to be 65 mg/kg BM and taken every 3-4 hours as a split dose e.g 0.8 to 1.2g over 12 weeks.

Increase in performance is small, but potentially meaningful with increases of 0.2 to 3% in performance. ​Reasons to not supplement are that the supplements effectiveness is harder to see if you are well trained already.

Large variations in carnosine production has been reported between studies and that authors state that further investigation is needed for for practical implications in sport.

So take Beta-alanine and it’s benefits with a slight pinch of salt.

​If however you decide to,  side effects can be skin rashes and or transient paraesthesia

​Supplements for an In-Direct Effect on Performance


Multiple supplements claim to be able to aid your health, ability to train hard, recover, adapt, repair from injury and stop muscle soreness. A particular area is our immune system where becoming ill can drastically impact training programmes and competitions.

The most promising supplements for helping prevent illness  is Vitamin D.

Vitamin C however is great for periods of heavy exertion.

It’s zinc however if it is too late and you are starting to get symptoms.

An important note to make is that high doses of vitamin C has been found to reduced training adaptations.

​Supplements For Immune Health


Vitamin D-

This is essential for immunity and is know to influence several aspects of it. Our skin exposure to sunlight (aka vitamin D) accounts to 90% of our intake. This explains why in the winter months it is relatively easy to have less than we need!

Vitamin C

There is moderate research that vitamin C supplementation helps reduce the possibility of colds, sneezes and runny noses. However once you are coughing etc taking >200mg a day of it doesn’t help. Therefore don’t go loading up on orange juice once your cold has started!

​Gaining & Losing Body Mass

When gaining, Protein is the one main supplement that comes to mind. Thankfully there is a lot of science backing proteins effects of putting on mass when mixed in with resistance training.

Evidence for ‘fat burning’ supplements is far from being conclusive and there is a complete and absence of evidence of this effectiveness for many of these supplements.

Examples of these include green tea and omega 3 which studies have found them to have only a small to trivial effect on fat loss.

​Conclusion!

​Supplements can  play  a  small  role  in  an  athlete’s  sports  nutrition  plan,  with  products  that  include  essential  micronutrients,  performance  supplements  and  health  supplements. All of these potentially providing benefits to you and I.

Some  supplements,  when  used  appropriately,  may  help  you  to  meet  sports  nutrition  goals,  to train  harder,  and  stay  healthy  and  injury-free.  Only few supplements can directly enhance competition performance. 

It  takes  a lot of  effort  and  expert knowledge to identify which supplements are appropriate, how to integrate them into the your nutrition plan, and  how  to  ensure  that  any  benefits  outweigh  potential  negative  side  effects.

To work out the potential positives and benefits this analysis would be best done with an input of a well-informed sports nutrition professional.


For Additional information visit Br J Sports Med. 2018 Apr;52(7):439-455. doi: 10.1136/bjsports-2018-099027. Epub 2018 Mar 14.

Marathon Tips Part 2

Marathon Tips Part 1

The 3 Types Of Recovery

The relationship between recovery and fatigue and its impact on performance has attracted the interest of  sports  science for  many years. 

An  good balance between stress  (training  and competition  load,  other  life  demands)  and  recovery is  essential for  athletes to achieve continuous high-level performance

Recovery is an umbrella term which can be further characterized by different techniques of recovery such as regeneration or psychological recovery strategies.

Regeneration in sport and exercise refers to the physiological aspect of recovery and ideally follows  fatigue induced by training or competition. Cold water immersion and sleep is a common recovery strategy for this.

In contrast there is also mental fatigue, this can be recovered by cognitive Self-regulation, resource activation, and psychological relaxation techniques (think meditation).




​​Recovery can be broken down into 3 types, passive, active and pro-active recovery.

1. An example of passive recovery is a service I offer which is massage coupled with PNF stretching.

2. An example Active recovery is cool down jogging the idea behind this is that it compensates for the metabolic response of physical fatigue.

3. For proactive recovery, this is a mixture of both of the above and using them as part of your weekly training sessions e.g. a weekly massage or using compression garments after training.


Fatigue isn’t all bad, this is because, a certain degree of fatigue is needed as this causes functional overreaching- (this is required to improve performance).

If you would like more help with recovery and/or would like to book a session passive recovery give me a ring on 07759689612 or email me at [email protected]​.

 I’ll be happy to help with any queries and to book you in.

​ Testimonial

Injury Treatment review


​L. Brymner

​Recreational Gym User

​​I had suffered a bad strain from the gym in my upper back trap area and was very immobile and causing me tension headaches. Rob managed to source the problem and relieve some of the soreness and get me on the road to recovery my back and neck were back too 100% within a couple of days and I was back in the gym, could not recommend rob more if you've got any pains or long lasting injuries I'd highly suggest you see Rob! Lewis

The relationship between recovery and fatigue and its impact on performance has attracted the interest of  sports  science for  many years. 

An  good balance between stress  (training  and competition  load,  other  life  demands)  and  recovery is  essential for  athletes to achieve continuous high-level performance

Recovery is an umbrella term which can be further characterized by different techniques of recovery such as regeneration or psychological recovery strategies.

Regeneration in sport and exercise refers to the physiological aspect of recovery and ideally follows  fatigue induced by training or competition. Cold water immersion and sleep is a common recovery strategy for this.

In contrast there is also mental fatigue, this can be recovered by cognitive Self-regulation, resource activation, and psychological relaxation techniques (think meditation).

​​Recovery can be broken down into 3 types, passive, active and pro-active recovery.

1. An example of passive recovery is a service I offer which is massage coupled with PNF stretching.

2. An example Active recovery is cool down jogging the idea behind this is that it compensates for the metabolic response of physical fatigue.

3. For proactive recovery, this is a mixture of both of the above and using them as part of your weekly training sessions e.g. a weekly massage or using compression garments after training.

Fatigue isn’t all bad, this is because, a certain degree of fatigue is needed as this causes functional overreaching- (this is required to improve performance).

If you would like more help with recovery and/or would like to book a session passive recovery give me a ring on 07759689612 or email me at [email protected]​.

 I’ll be happy to help with any queries and to book you in.

​ Testimonial

Injury Treatment review

​L. Brymner

​Recreational Gym User

​​I had suffered a bad strain from the gym in my upper back trap area and was very immobile and causing me tension headaches. Rob managed to source the problem and relieve some of the soreness and get me on the road to recovery my back and neck were back too 100% within a couple of days and I was back in the gym, could not recommend rob more if you've got any pains or long lasting injuries I'd highly suggest you see Rob! Lewis

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